Jared Compton, Ph.D.

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Jared serves as assistant professor of Greek and New Testament Theology at Bethlehem College & Seminary, a post he took up in 2020. Before coming to Bethlehem, Jared served as pastor for discipleship and pastoral-training at CrossWay Community Church (Bristol, WI) and assistant professor of New Testament at Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary (Allen Park, MI), a school where his dad has been teaching for over 35 years. Jared received his Ph.D. in New Testament from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School under the supervision of D. A. Carson.

Jared loves teaching and preaching the Bible and training others to do the same. He loves thinking and talking about how the Bible fits together and how we fit into the Bible’s big story. He also loves (and sometimes hates!) writing. Jared’s written articles and reviews for several publications and published three books, most recently Biblical Theology according to the Apostles: How the Earliest Christians Told Israel’s Story (IVP, 2020), a book he wrote with two of his childhood friends. He’s served on the editorial board for Themelios and Trinity Journal and is presently a member of ETS & IBR. Best of all, he’s been a Christian for nearly 30 years, married to his best friend Charisse for nearly 16 years, and has been telling dad jokes for 13 years. Jared, Charisse, and their three children—Asher (13), Jude (11), and Haven (9)—live in Arden Hills and are active members of Bethlehem’s North Campus

Educational Credentials

  • B.A., Bob Jones University (English)
  • M.Div., Detroit Baptist Theological Seminary
  • Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (New Testament)

Books

  • Biblical Theology according to the Apostles: How the Earliest Christians Told Israel’s Story. Co-authored with Chris Bruno and Kevin McFadden. New Studies in Biblical Theology. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 2020.
  • Three Views on Israel and the Church in Romans 9–11. Co-edited with Andy Naselli. Viewpoints. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 2019.
  • Psalm 110 and the Logic of Hebrews. Library of New Testament Studies 537. New York: T&T Clark, 2015.

Selected Publications

  • “John Davenant’s Dissertation on the Death of Christ: A Review Essay (with an Invitation).” Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 21 (2016): 167–81.
  • Review of Atonement and the Logic of Resurrection in the Epistle to the Hebrews, by David M. Moffitt. Trinity Journal 36 (Spring 2015): 133–35.
  • “Dialogue with a Skeptic Concerning the Resurrection of Christ.” Bible and Spade 25 (Fall 2012): 103–8.
  • “Is the New Testament the Word of God?” Bible and Spade 24 (Summer 2011): 58–66.
  • “The Origin of ΣΩΜΑ in Heb 10:5: Another Look at a Recent Proposal.” Trinity Journal 32 (Spring 2011): 19–29.
  • Review of Psalms and Hebrews: Studies in Reception, by Dirk J. Human and Gert J. Steyn, ed. Themelios 36 (May 2011): 94–96.
  • Review of The Letter to the Hebrews, by Peter T. O’Brien. Themelios 35 (July 2010): 278–79.
  • Review of Allegory Transformed: The Appropriation of Philonic Hermeneutics in the Letter to the Hebrews, by Stefan Nordgaard Svendsen. Themelios 35 (July 2010): 276–78.
  • Review of Susan E. Docherty, The Use of the Old Testament in Hebrews: A Case Study in Early Jewish Bible Interpretation, Themelios 35 (April 2010): 58–59. 
  • “Once More: Quirinius’s Census.” Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 14 (Fall 2009): 45–54.
  • “Is the Resurrection Historically Reliable?” Bible and Spade 22 (Fall 2009): 105–108.
  • Review of Women, Ministry and the Gospel: Exploring New Paradigms, by Mark Husbands and Timothy Larsen, ed. Journal of Biblical Manhood and Womanhood 14 (Fall 2009): 64–67.
  • Review of ‘You Are a Priest Forever’ Second Temple Jewish Messianism and the Priestly Christology of the Epistle to the Hebrews, by Eric F. Mason. Trinity Journal 31 (Spring 2009): 149–50.
  • Review of St. Paul’s Ephesus: Texts and Archaeology, by Jerome Murphy-O’Connor. Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 52 (March 2009): 169–71.          
  • “Shared Intentions? Reflections on Inspiration and Interpretation in Light of Scripture’s Dual Authorship.” Themelios 33 (December 2008): 22–33.
  • Review of Graeme Goldsworthy, Gospel-Centered Hermeneutics: Foundations and Principles of Evangelical Biblical Interpretation, Trinity Journal 29 (2008): 159–61